Statistics: For an average apartment in Harju County, 7.4 years’ mean wages have to be paid

In an Estonian average, 5.7 years’ mean net wages have to be paid on a transaction with an apartment. In Harju County, wages are higher; however, real estate there is also the most expensive. As a result, far more – 7.4 years’ wages – has to be paid on an average transaction with an apartment in the capital and its vicinity.

On an average transaction with an apartment, sellers of real estate charge 5.8 years’ wages in Tartu County and 4.1 years’ wages in Pärnu County. (more…)

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Statistics: There are 159,411 residential mortgage loans in Estonia

The average residential mortgage loan in Estonia fell to €36,802 in Q3 2013. However, the changes are not significant – the loan balance a year ago was just 1% bigger than today.

The average loan amount is decreasing mainly as a result of new residential mortgage loans. The total number of residential mortgage loans just a year ago was 157,600, but the relevant indicator at the end of Q3 2013 was 159,400. This shows an increase of 1.2%.

The main factor behind the increase in the number of residential mortgage loans is the interest rate, which has remained very low for a year now. The increase in average wages has supported the good impact of the low interest rate.

The fear of missing out on the price increase shared by home owners is also something that must be mentioned. The hope that the fast increase in apartment prices seen last year will also continue in the coming years is an increasingly more frequent reason for buying a home.

Balance and number of residential mortgage loans in Estonia under repayment

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Real Estate Prices In Estonia See Fall In July 2012

According to a recent article in the Estonian Press Digest from News2Biz, July 2012 saw something of a fall in real estate prices in Estonia as a whole, but at the same time real purchasing power (in Tallinn) for those wishing to purchase property also fell.

Citing real estate giant Pindi Kinnisvara‘s index as falling by 5.4 per cent between June and July, the report also stated that the real purchasing power of a Tallinn resident earning an average wage would stretch to a property of 68 square metres in area.

The Pindi Index is based on the weighted average transactions across the 17 largest Estonian towns (Tallinn is of course the largest with over 400 000 inhabitants, whereas 17th placed town is Kiviõli in Ida-Virumaa with only a little over six and a half thousand souls).

The average price of apartments per square metre in June 2012 for the whole of Estonia was 886 Euros, falling to 838 Euros per square metre in July, according to the report.

Not surprisingly the lower prices were accompanied by a somewhat higher rate of transactions – 991 in July, compared with 934 the previous month (this only covers the 17 cities incorporated in the Pindi index) the report stated.

According to the article, residents of Tartu and Pärnu can stretch to apartments a little larger in size when measured by their purchasing power levels (at 73 and 84 square metres respectively).

The Pindi Index reached an all time peak in April 2007 at the height of the boom, and an all time low in July 2009 (624.2 Euros per square metre).

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Apartments For Rent In Tallinn Increase Y-o-Y Slightly In Number, Greater By Rent Price

There has been a y-o-y increase in rental prices in Tallinn of 18 per cent, to July 2012, according to Tõnu Toompark on his adaur blog.

This undoubtedly is connected with the short supply of rental properties in Tallinn at the moment.

According to Tõnu and citing data from real estate portal kv.ee, the volume of rental apartments on the market has increased y-o-y, but not by much, which may put a downward pressure on residential rental prices through the summer and autumn – as noted there has been a rise up to now.

Tõnu cites more data from kv.ee which states that there were 1 996 apartments up for rent on the portal in June, which is only a two per cent increase y-o-y.

However, the shortage in availablility of rental items is not as perceptible today as was the case a year ago, Tõnu continues.

This will be predominant in those areas of Tallinn where more apartments have come on to the rental market, which has happened in all districts. writes Tõnu, except North Tallinn (which includes Kalamaja and Kopli) the Soviet-era residential district of Mustamäe and the leafy, sought-after outer suburb of Nõmme. These three areas have seen a fall in the volume of rental apartments available (by as much as -37 per cent in the case of Nõmme).

Fallinn demand may be the result of rising rental asking prices (as well as the latter being the result of falling supply). The average rental asking price in Tallinn was a 6.10 Euros per square metre in July 2011; a year later that figure had risen to 7.20 Euros per square metre.

In any event this makes the rental market attractive for investors; a shortage of supply and rising rental levels mean a property could be let out very quickly and at higher prices, ensuring good cashflow.

The district of Tallinn with the highest rise in number of rental apartments available y-o-y to July 2012 was the residential suburb of Kristiine, according to Tõnu’s data, at 23 per cent. The city centre (which includes the Old Town) saw a 10 per cent rise in number of available apartments over the same period, from 736 to 806 items (also by far the highest total number of items of any region, as might be expected).

Outside of Tallinn, Pärnu saw an 18 per cent rise in apartments available for rent, whereas Tartu saw the opposite trend with a -26 per cent fall over the same period.

The figure for the whole of Estonia was a -4 per cent fall.

The original article (in Estonian) and data is here.

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Statistics: 96 Per Cent Of Residential Dwelling Space In Estonia Is In Private Sector

According to Tõnu Toompark on his adaur blog, 96 per cent of residential dwelling space in Estonia is in private hands.

The total number of residential items comes to 657 800 units, only a small increase on the last 12 years, with only three per cent of dwellings owned by local governments and one per cent by the state, writes Tõnu.

Given the upheaval of the collapse of the USSR 20 years ago and the wholesale transferral of ownership from state to private sector this is perhaps unsurprising, and is no doubt a factor in the somewhat active real estate market here, compared with some neighbouring countries (e.g. the Scandinavian nations) where public sector housing will account for a much higher proportion.

The original article (in Estonian) is available here.

 

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Increase In Number Of Houses On The Property Market In Estonia

According to Tõnu Toompark on his adaur blog, although the kv.ee index* of property prices in Estonia has seen only scant changes over the past year (a 0.98 per cent y-o-y fall to June 2012) this does not tell the whole story as regards the market here.

For one thing, the index has been fairly stable over the past couple of years (the index is based on asking prices rather than transaction prices**) which means that vendors have not had unrealistic expectations. On the other hand, transaction prices (which are naturally lower than asking prices) have at least in some areas been creeping up towards the levels of asking prices, which has led to a quite active property market over the last few quarters, writes Tõnu.

One area where the statistics bear this out is in the number of houses which have appeared on the market recently – 409 in the year to June 2012. Now, 409 may not sound like a lot of items, but it is worth taking a look at the number of houses on the market at any one time. At the time of writing (13.00 on 25th July) there were, on the kv.ee portal itself, 14 516 apartments for sale in the whole of Estonia (5 646 in Tallinn) as against 8 000 houses (621 in Tallinn). In other words the property market in Estonia, and in Tallinn in particular, is dominated by apartments. The city24.ee portal paints a similar picture, with 14 115 apartments for sale across Estonia versus 6 101 houses.

It needs to be pointed out here that the two portals’ statistics are likely to represent a figure for items on the market which is higher than the actual figure (due in part to the same property being listed by multiple agents and so counted more than once, or ‘dead’ properties which have been listed for several years); nonetheless Tõnu cites 5 654 houses being on the market in Estonia in June 2012.

This increase in supply of houses on the market has not been uniform throughout the country, although in all but two counties (Maakond) in Estonia, there have been increases, some of them substantial. For example in the county of Läänemaa there was a 58 per cent increase in numbers of houses on the market, according to Tõnu’s data.

The two exceptions were Viljandimaa which saw a -24 per cent fall in supply, and Lääne-Virumaa which saw a -6 per cent fall (there are 15 counties in Estonia).

In addition to that, no data was available for changes in supply of houses in Põlvamaa (though only 15 houses were listed as for sale in June 2012 here).

The figure for Estonia as a whole was an increase of 8 per cent in the supply of houses on the market (409 items as noted).

As regards prices of houses, changes were more variable. As might be expected from microeconomic theory, an increase in supply led to a fall in asking prices in a lot of counties (as much as -27 per cent in Järvamaa in central Estonia). However five counties actually saw an increase in asking prices, including the key counties of   Tartumaa, Harjumaa (where Tallinn is located) and Pärnumaa (increases of six, two and one per cent respectively). Reasons for this are largely speculative, although it is worth noting that when taken as a whole, Estonia saw no change in asking prices.

In summary: both asking prices and transaction prices remaining pretty static in the market for houses in Estonia, but there is an increasing availability of houses to buy nonetheless.

The original article by Tõnu Toompark (in Estonian) is here.

*The KV.ee index, which commenced on 18th February, 2008 (i.e. this is the date on which the value of the index is calibrated at 100) measures the week on week change in residential real estate prices in Estonia. The data has been measured back anachronistically to 1 January, 2005, when the index stood at an “all time” low of 49.9. The “all time” high came on 7th May, 2007, when it stood at 108. Following the economic downturn of 2008 onwards, the index reached a low point (to date) of 61.4 on two occasions, on 5th September and 27th October, 2010.

**Please see our recent article on the translation of the Estonian words ‘pakkumine’ and ‘pakkumushind’.

 

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Statistics: Residential Space In Estonia Has Increased 0.4 Per Cent Y-o-Y

Citing figures from the Estonain statistics office, Tõnu Toompark has reported on his Adaur blog that the total number of newly constructed residential units compared with the existing housing stock has increased by 0.4 per cent y-o-y, to 2012. The actual area of residential space versus existing stock increased by 0.68 per cent over the same period.

These may not seem like huge figures, but we are talking about increases as compared with the existing stock of course; the figures for the ‘boom’ years were much higher, with an approximately 1.1 per cent increase in numbers of units compared with stock in the peak year of 2007 (and over 1.4 per cent when measuring new developments by area) and at no point during the slump did the figures actually move into negative numbers.

That said, a one per cent increase in new housing over existing stock is required to account for depreciation in that existing housing, according to Tõnu. The magic one per cent figure will allow the maintaining of the quality of housing, or indeed an improvement through refurbishments and renovation work, Tõnu explains.

However, at best, there are only three years so far where that has happened, at least when going on area of residential stock (rather than numbers of units) namely 2007 as we have noted, and the two years either side of that. Thus in general there has been a deterioration in the overall quality of the housing stock over the last few years, when applying this rule, Tõnu notes.

That said, the situation is markedly better than was the case prior to the boom; 10 years ago in 2002 the number of new units compared with housing stock had only risen by 0.18 per cent y-o-y and the figure for area of new residential space had only increased by 0.3 per cent on the existing stock, writes Tõnu.

The original article (in Estonian) is here including a graph of y-o-y figures for ratio of new residential developments (by number and by area) to total stock.

It will be interesting to see if the mini-boom in construction which is taking place at present, and likely to be accompanied with a growth in commercial construction due to a dearth in good office space, will contribute to pushing the ratio of new housing to existing stock closer to the desired one per cent mark.

Goodson & Red Tallinn Property Consultancy is a premier real estate service in Estonia, specialising in residential and commercial Tallinn real estate, with a strong focus on consultancy services for overseas property investors in Estonia. Our recent media accolades include mentions in both the UK quality newspaper the Daily Telegraph, and the New York Times.

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Statistics: Volume Of Residential Space In Tallinn Has Increased 0.29 Per Cent Y-o-Y

The volume of residential space in Estonia, according to data from the Estonian Statistics Office, stood at 657 800 items with a total area of 40.53 million square metres, as reported by Tõnu Toompark on his adaur blog.

This represents an increase in the number of residential items of 0.29 per cent y-o-y, and an increase in area of residential space of 0.52 per cent, writes Tõnu.

A typical residential property according to the data will be around 30.3 square metres in area; 10 years ago it stood at 27.5 square metres, Tõnu continues.

There are currently 491 residential units per 1 000 people in Estonia, or 2.04 people per unit. In 2002 that figure stood at 457 units per 1 000 people or 2.19 people per unit, Tõnu continues.

The original article (in Estonian) with diagrams showing changes in numbers of residential units and total living space area, plus changes in average living space area and number of residential units per 1 000 inhabitants, is available here.

 

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“Why You Should Be Investing In Tallinn Real Estate – Your Essential Guide to the Tallinn Property Market”: Available Soon!

We haven’t forgotten about our promise to launch the new Guide “”Why You Should Be Investing In Tallinn Real Estate – Your Essential Guide to the Tallinn Property Market”: Available Soon!”.

Our team are putting the finishing touches to the publication and it will be out very soon so watch this space!.

Goodson & Red Tallinn Property Consultancy is a premier residential and commercial property service based in Tallinn, Estonia, with a strong focus on consultancy services for overseas property investors. Our recent media accolades include mentions in both the UK quality newspaper the Daily Telegraph, and the New York Times.

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