small-home

Small Flats Attract Both Home Buyers, as well as Rental Property Investors

According to the data of the Statistical Office, a total of 2264 residential properties were built in Tallinn in 2016. Only 6% i.e. 133 of these properties built were one-room flats. 850 of the properties i.e. 38% were two-room flats, while 35% or 790 properties were three-room flats. 22% i.e. 491 of the residential properties built in 2016 were flats with four rooms and above

This shows that the residential property development process in Tallinn is clearly skewed towards two- and three-room flats. Such predominance of flats with smaller number of room is caused by better liquidity of flats of such size, i.e. the estimated shorter selling period. A shorter selling period allows developers to exit from the project within an optimum period of time and keep their risks at a controllable level.

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€100m makeover for Linnahall to be completed in 2019

Reconstruction of the long-abandoned Linnahall entertainment arena in Tallinn’s port area is expected to be completed in 2019 at a total cost exceeding 100 million euros.

“During the past six months, we worked toward making sure how to proceed,” said Deputy Mayor Taavi Aas, standing in for the mayor, at a press conference on Tuesday. “I am beginning to hope that the grand house with a grand history will come to life again. We have reached an agreement with the government that we will do it together.”

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Narva Highway becomes Tallinn Main Street – detailed plan announced

The Tallinn Main Street design contest winner has been been declared. In three years, according to the plan, the fresh concept will alter the face and ways of the heart of Tallinn.

The winner of the Tallinn Main Street design contest is «Kevad linnas» (Spring in the City) with the accent on creating a humans based space and bringing back the legendary, almost lost Bastion belt.
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Statistics: There are 159,411 residential mortgage loans in Estonia

The average residential mortgage loan in Estonia fell to €36,802 in Q3 2013. However, the changes are not significant – the loan balance a year ago was just 1% bigger than today.

The average loan amount is decreasing mainly as a result of new residential mortgage loans. The total number of residential mortgage loans just a year ago was 157,600, but the relevant indicator at the end of Q3 2013 was 159,400. This shows an increase of 1.2%.

The main factor behind the increase in the number of residential mortgage loans is the interest rate, which has remained very low for a year now. The increase in average wages has supported the good impact of the low interest rate.

The fear of missing out on the price increase shared by home owners is also something that must be mentioned. The hope that the fast increase in apartment prices seen last year will also continue in the coming years is an increasingly more frequent reason for buying a home.

Balance and number of residential mortgage loans in Estonia under repayment

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Statistics: Residential development loan balance down by 17% in a year

According to the Bank of Estonia, the balance of loans granted for investment properties and development in Q3 2013 was €1.7 billion. This is 4.6% less than in the previous year.

The loan balance of retail property financing has decreased by 21% and the loan balance of residential development by 17%.

The decrease in the residential development loan balance is the result of the low new loan turnover. In Q3 2013 banks issued loans in the amount of €7.5 million for residential development, which is one of the lowest figures in recent years.

Balance of loans granted to non-financial companies by purpose graph

Turnover of loans granted to non-financial companies by purpose graph

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Apartments For Rent In Tallinn Increase Y-o-Y Slightly In Number, Greater By Rent Price

There has been a y-o-y increase in rental prices in Tallinn of 18 per cent, to July 2012, according to Tõnu Toompark on his adaur blog.

This undoubtedly is connected with the short supply of rental properties in Tallinn at the moment.

According to Tõnu and citing data from real estate portal kv.ee, the volume of rental apartments on the market has increased y-o-y, but not by much, which may put a downward pressure on residential rental prices through the summer and autumn – as noted there has been a rise up to now.

Tõnu cites more data from kv.ee which states that there were 1 996 apartments up for rent on the portal in June, which is only a two per cent increase y-o-y.

However, the shortage in availablility of rental items is not as perceptible today as was the case a year ago, Tõnu continues.

This will be predominant in those areas of Tallinn where more apartments have come on to the rental market, which has happened in all districts. writes Tõnu, except North Tallinn (which includes Kalamaja and Kopli) the Soviet-era residential district of Mustamäe and the leafy, sought-after outer suburb of Nõmme. These three areas have seen a fall in the volume of rental apartments available (by as much as -37 per cent in the case of Nõmme).

Fallinn demand may be the result of rising rental asking prices (as well as the latter being the result of falling supply). The average rental asking price in Tallinn was a 6.10 Euros per square metre in July 2011; a year later that figure had risen to 7.20 Euros per square metre.

In any event this makes the rental market attractive for investors; a shortage of supply and rising rental levels mean a property could be let out very quickly and at higher prices, ensuring good cashflow.

The district of Tallinn with the highest rise in number of rental apartments available y-o-y to July 2012 was the residential suburb of Kristiine, according to Tõnu’s data, at 23 per cent. The city centre (which includes the Old Town) saw a 10 per cent rise in number of available apartments over the same period, from 736 to 806 items (also by far the highest total number of items of any region, as might be expected).

Outside of Tallinn, Pärnu saw an 18 per cent rise in apartments available for rent, whereas Tartu saw the opposite trend with a -26 per cent fall over the same period.

The figure for the whole of Estonia was a -4 per cent fall.

The original article (in Estonian) and data is here.

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Redevelopment Of Train Station Area In Tallinn, Estonia Up For Tender

As recently reported on this blog, one of the up and coming areas of Tallinn is the area surrounding the train station, merging into the Kalamaja and Pelgulinn neighbourhoods.

Our faith in this seems to be bearing fruit; according to a recent report by Ott Tammik on the Estonian Public Broadcasting (ERR) English language site, the City of Tallinn is drafting the very terms and conditions for the tender of architectural plans that will make this long yearned-for development become a reality.

The project has been in the offing for some 11 years, and will replace the existing Balti Jaama Turg (Train Station Market). Not surprisingly the developments are not unopposed – one point of contention is the reassigning of Reisijate Street, currently closed to traffic and taken up by much of the marketplace itself, as a traffic street, and the existing Kopli Steet to become a four lane thoroughfare, the report stated.

Currently traffic is undoubtedly congested, particularly at rush hour, since Kopli Street is a one way street along the stretch that passes the train station. New developments would require better road access.

Other dissenting or at least questioning voices, as well as market traders, include national rail carrier Eesti Raudtee who wish to preserve some rail sidings and have space for additional platforms in future, according to the report.

Previous architectural plans had met with objections due to apartment developments blocking the view of Toompea, the seat of the Estonian government and the highest point of the old town.

As noted on this blog the area where Telliskivi Street crosses train tracks adjacent to the station is already something of a bohemian quarter, with two or three successful restaurants and various other businesses.

The original report is available here.

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Estonian Finance Ministry Building In Tallinn To Be Demolished, Rebuilt

According to a report by Ott Tammik on the English language site of the Estonian Public Broadcasters (ERR) the building which houses the Estonian Finance Ministry is to be demolished and two new, identical towers are to be built in its stead.

The current building at Suur-Ameerika 1, which was constructed back in 1977 when Estonia was a constitutent republic of the former USSR, has been declared unfit for renovation (which was the original intention) according to the report.

The work is due to start some time in 2013 and whilst the new buildings, which will also house the Ministry of The Economy, the Ministry of the Interior and the Ministry of Social Affairs from 2016, are to resemble the existing building externally, the interior will comprise modern, open plan offices rather than separate office rooms as is currently the case, according to the report.

This has not been met with unified approval, it would seem. The Estonian Architect’s Union called the building an architecturally valuable monument to its era and the decision to demolish it ‘strange’, the report stated.

Possible interim accomodation for the Finance Ministry during the period of construction could be the current Tax and Customs’ Board (EMTA) offices in various locations around Tallinn. EMTA is due to relocate to new premises in Ülemiste in the second half 2013.

Goodson & Red Tallinn Property Consultancy is a premier real estate service in Estonia, specialising in residential and commercial Tallinn real estate, with a strong focus on consultancy services for overseas property investors in Estonia. Our recent media accolades include mentions in both the UK quality newspaper the Daily Telegraph, and the New York Times.

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Apartment Prices Showing Slight Y-o-Y Rise in Tallinn, Estonia

Most of the major newspapers in Tallinn are taking a break today after Jaanipäev but here at Tallinn Property we don’t want to take a break from bringing you up to speed on all that is happening in real estate in Tallinn and Estonia in general!

According to a report on Tõnu Toompark’s adaur blog, signs of very slight price increases in property prices in Tallinn and Estonia as a whole can be gleaned from the latest kv.ee index. The kv.ee index currently stands at 61 points which is all of a 0.5 per cent y-o-y increase. Offer prices statistics for both Tallinn and some of the provincial towns show more concrete evidence of modest increases.

Meanwhile the volume of apartment offers remains at about the same level it was a year ago, though in Tallinn the level is about one per cent lower with 8 700 apartments currently under offer, writes Tõnu.  Average offer prices for the whole of Tallinn (apartments) currently stands at 1 317 Euros/square metre.

That said, agents have shown some optimisim in reporting a slight rise in offer prices on Tallinn flats, Tõnu continues. At the same time it needs to be pointed out that offer price rises remain below the growth in actual deal prices. Whereas the offer price on Tallinn apartments has seen a five per cent rise y-o-y, actual deal prices have seen a seven per cent rise over the same period, Tõnu says.

According to the data, within Tallinn, the district to have seen the highest rise in offer prices is Kristiine with an eight per cent increase from 9 May, 2011 to 9 May, 2012 (average price of 1 316 Euros/square metre). The Old Town actually saw a decrease of one per cent in offer prices over the same period (average price of 2 792 Euros/square metre). The greatest increase in volume of offers over the same period was in North Tallinn with an increase of 13 per cent (to 1 418 offers) though many areas saw a fall y-o-y, as high as -18 per cent in Pirita (278 offers). Outside of Tallinn, Tartu has also seen a fall in the volume of offers (-22 per cent) whilst simultaneously experiencing an increase in offer prices of eight per cent (average of 1 051 Euros/square metre).

Estonia as a whole has seen only small increases in both number of apartment offers at two per cent (18 511 currently) and an increase in average offer prices of three per cent (1 004 Euros/square metre).

The full article and statistics (in Estonian) can be viewed here.

The kv.ee index, which commenced on 18 February, 2008 (i.e. this is the date on which the value of the index is calibrated at 100) measures the week on week change in residential real estate prices in Estonia. The data has been measured back anachronistically to 1 January, 2005, when the index stood at an “all time” low of 49.9. The “all time” high came on 7 May, 2007, when it stood at 108.

Goodson & Red Tallinn Property Consultancy is a premier residential and commercial property service based in Tallinn, Estonia, with a strong focus on consultancy services for overseas property investors. Our recent media accolades include mentions in both the UK quality newspaper the Daily Telegraph, and the New York Times.

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